22 | german | design student

i'll post stuff that inspires me!

people | music | nature | concept art | food | typography | fashion | photography | paintings | architecture | comic/anime | movies | and more...
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golodomor:

Albrecht von Haller, “Veins of the Hand, Forearm, and Arm”, 1741. From Illustrated Encyclopedia of Human Anatomic Variation: Opus II: Cardiovascular System
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wi-ch:

MAGICAL REALISM45 x 50 cmoil on canvas2014
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maciekjasik:

© Viviane Sassen
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blastedheath:

Sven Svendsen (Norwegian/American, 1864-1934), Tree Trunks in Snow. Oil on Canvas, 32 x 24 in.
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art-elysian:

Emily Connell - Mixed media book sculptures. 
art-elysian:

Emily Connell - Mixed media book sculptures. 
art-elysian:

Emily Connell - Mixed media book sculptures. 
art-elysian:

Emily Connell - Mixed media book sculptures. 
art-elysian:

Emily Connell - Mixed media book sculptures. 
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rhamphotheca:

NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (Little SDO)
 A suite of NASA’s Sun-gazing spacecraft have spotted an unusual series of eruptions in which a series of fast puffs forced the slow ejection of a massive burst of solar material from the Sun’s atmosphere.
The eruptions took place over a period of three days, starting on Jan. 17, 2013. Nathalia Alzate, a solar scientist at the University of Aberystwyth in Wales, presented findings on what caused the puffs at the 2014 Royal Astronomical Society’s National Astronomy Meeting in Portsmouth, England.

The sun’s outermost atmosphere, the corona, is made of magnetized solar material, called plasma, that has a temperature of millions of degrees and extends millions of miles into space. On January 17, the joint European Space Agency and NASA’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO, spacecraft observed puffs emanating from the base of the corona and rapidly exploding outwards into interplanetary space. The puffs occurred roughly once every three hours. After about 12 hours, a much larger eruption of material began, apparently eased out by the smaller-scale explosions…

(read more)
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malformalady:

Piebaldism is a condition characterized by the absence of cells called melanocytes in certain areas of the skin and hair. Melanocytes produce the pigment melanin, which contributes to hair, eye, and skin color. The absence of melanocytes leads to patches of skin and hair that are lighter than normal. Approximately 90% of affected individuals have a white section of hair near their front hairline (a white forelock). The eyelashes, the eyebrows, and the skin under the forelock may also be unpigmented. People with piebaldism usually have other unpigmented patches of skin, typically appearing symmetrically on both sides of the body.
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silversora:

"Dave.."
"Fuck off Shaun I am taking a picture."
"DAVE."
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